g.l.o.w.
gay, lesbian, or whatever.
a safe space for queers and allies on the internet who want intelligent discourse, a mind-opening and accepting atmosphere, the desire and ability to educate and be educated, advice, support, friendship, love, and maybe a little bit more gay on your dash.

please read our faq/policies page before making submissions or posting messages.

to new followers: welcome! introduce yourself if you like. open to all who wish to listen, look, think, teach, or learn.



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inkskinned:

it’s disgusting that people think bisexuals are only experimenting.

like excuse you, we all are proud users of the full scientific method and i assure you that the whole time we have been on your planet we have not just experimented, we’ve also collected some interesting data points in regards to the takeover of this small water marble. what do you think we are, amateurs? 


Mary Coble. Untitled 3 (from Note to Self), 2005.“Note to Self” was a twelve hour performance where the names of 438 gay, lesbian, bi and transgender individuals who were murdered due to hate crimes were tattooed onto the artist’s body using no ink.

Mary Coble. Untitled 3 (from Note to Self), 2005.

“Note to Self” was a twelve hour performance where the names of 438 gay, lesbian, bi and transgender individuals who were murdered due to hate crimes were tattooed onto the artist’s body using no ink.

freelgbtqpia:


On October 10, 1970, the day she was born, she was named Dorothy Maree Alaniz—a baby girl. Curiously, though, no one filled out a birth certificate that day. When the certificate was finally filed on November 5, the name on it was Rudolph Andrew Alaniz. Within less than one month after her birth, this girl became a boy.” 
Every year in the United States, more than two thousand children are born with an intersex condition or disorder of sex development. What makes someone a boy or a girl? Is it external genitalia, chromosomes, DNA, environment, or some combination of these factors? Not even doctors or scientists are entirely clear. What is clear is that sex is not an either-or proposition: not girl/boy, XX/XY, switching between two poles like an on-off switch on a radio. Rather, sex is like the bass and treble knobs on that radio. Between XX and XY provides a fascinating look at the science of sex and what makes people male or female.
There are people born XXY, XXXY, or XXXXY, or with any number of variations in X or Y chromosomes, but those who do not fit into society’s preconceived notions about sex often face a difficult path in life. Dr. Callahan explores why humans are so attached to the idea of two sexes, and examines our obsession with sex and sexual intercourse through the ages.

[PDF]

freelgbtqpia:

On October 10, 1970, the day she was born, she was named Dorothy Maree Alaniz—a baby girl. Curiously, though, no one filled out a birth certificate that day. When the certificate was finally filed on November 5, the name on it was Rudolph Andrew Alaniz. Within less than one month after her birth, this girl became a boy.” 

Every year in the United States, more than two thousand children are born with an intersex condition or disorder of sex development. What makes someone a boy or a girl? Is it external genitalia, chromosomes, DNA, environment, or some combination of these factors? Not even doctors or scientists are entirely clear. What is clear is that sex is not an either-or proposition: not girl/boy, XX/XY, switching between two poles like an on-off switch on a radio. Rather, sex is like the bass and treble knobs on that radio. Between XX and XY provides a fascinating look at the science of sex and what makes people male or female.

There are people born XXY, XXXY, or XXXXY, or with any number of variations in X or Y chromosomes, but those who do not fit into society’s preconceived notions about sex often face a difficult path in life. Dr. Callahan explores why humans are so attached to the idea of two sexes, and examines our obsession with sex and sexual intercourse through the ages.

[PDF]

Johnnie Phelps, a woman sergeant in the army, thought, “There was a tolerance for lesbianism if they needed you. The battalion I was in was probably about ninety-seven percent lesbian.”
Sergeant Phelps worked for General Eisenhower. Four decades after Eisenhower had defeated the Axis powers, Phelps recalled an extraordinary event. One day, the general told her, “I’m giving you an order to ferret those lesbians out. We’re going to get rid of them.”
“I looked at him and then I looked at his secretary who was standing next to me, and I said, ‘Well, sir, if the general pleases, sir, I’ll be happy to do this investigation for you. But you have to know that the first name on the list will be mine.’ “
“And he was kind of taken aback a bit. And then this women standing next to me said, ‘Sir, if the General pleases, you must be aware that Sergeant Phelp’s name may be second, but mine will be first.”
“Then I looked at him, and said, ‘Sir, you’re right. They’re lesbians in the WAC battalion. And if the general is prepared to replace all the file clerks, all the section commanders, all the drivers-every woman in the WAC detachment-and there were about nine hundred and eighty something of us-then I’ll be happy to make that list. But I think the general should be aware that among those women are the most highly decorated women in the war. There have been no cases of illegal pregnancy. There have been no cases of AWOL. There have been no cases of misconduct. And as a matter of fact, every six months since we’ve been here, the general has awarded us a commendation for meritorious conduct.”
“And he said, ‘Forget the order.’”

The Gay Metropolis, page 47, Charles Kaiser (via bibliothekara)

Phelps tells this story herself in the excellent 1984 documentary Before Stonewall, which you can watch in its entirety on YouTube (she’s at 19:30, but really, watch the whole thing): https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=kX7AxQd82H8

(via theodoradove)

This makes me laugh every time I see it.

(via thegreatgodum)

queerability:

disabilityhistory:

Celebrating 40 Years of Disabled Lesbian Activism and Art

Image description: Five photos of disabled lesbians. #1: Color photo of people in a park, some of them holding a giant banner that reads “Honoring Dykes with Disabilities.” #2: Two women playing basketball in wheelchairs. #3: a black woman with glasses and natural hair playing ping pong. #4: Two light-skinned women dancing with AXIS, a physically integrated dance group. One woman in a wheelchair, and the other woman is…it’s hard to describe, but she’s upside-down, with her legs in the air, and her head in the woman’s lap, simulating oral sex.

These images come from Fabled/Asp, an organization that aims to “combine storytelling and filmmaking to document and continue the revolution in queer disability arts, aesthetics, politics and culture.” They’re such a great resource for history, culture, and politics of disabled lesbians.

What a wonderful resource!

transfriendly jobs

quiet-little-english-garden:

babybutta:

equiuszahhak:

 i’ve been doing research about jobs/companies that are accepting of trans and the like since i’m going job hunting again next month, and i found this list, which lists trans-friendly businesses. it links to this page, a directory for employers.

tagging so people can see it, i figured this might come in handy for some people!

BOOOOOOOOOOOOOOST

boostan

(Source: equiuszahhak)

burdenedwithgloriousbooty:

Jsyk: Bisexuality is not Diet Gay or Queer Lite, and if you think that, or think bi people can’t be radical queers, you need to get your priorities in order. 

actuallyintersex:

queershoulder:

I was reading a piece of memoir/writing-from-personal-life that is going around the tumblrz, by a non-binary person. (Note: I’m purposely not linking to it here because I don’t want to Tumblr Call-Out the author. They made a mistake, which I am going to…

allthingslinguistic:

Practice with Pronouns is a site that lets you practise subject, object, possessive, and reflexive forms of English third person pronouns. It comes with a few of the most common options, but you can also fill in whatever pronouns you like. Useful for both English learners and people wanting to practise using nonbinary pronouns.  
As if it couldn’t get any more delightful, it often uses quotes from Welcome to Night Vale in the practice sentences, which is definitely far more entertaining than See Spot Run. The feedback sentences are also very cute. 
(Hm, I’m pretty sure the second blank in that screenshot should have said “xyr”, in retrospect.)

allthingslinguistic:

Practice with Pronouns is a site that lets you practise subject, object, possessive, and reflexive forms of English third person pronouns. It comes with a few of the most common options, but you can also fill in whatever pronouns you like. Useful for both English learners and people wanting to practise using nonbinary pronouns.  

As if it couldn’t get any more delightful, it often uses quotes from Welcome to Night Vale in the practice sentences, which is definitely far more entertaining than See Spot Run. The feedback sentences are also very cute. 

(Hm, I’m pretty sure the second blank in that screenshot should have said “xyr”, in retrospect.)

gendermeh

mogai-archive:

definition: where youre kinda cool w being called any gender, like whatever. you might not be that gender, you might not know your gender, but meh.

coined by: branacle

ushistoryminuswhiteguys:

Lucy Hicks Anderson was a pioneer in the fight for marriage equality. She spent nearly sixty years living as a woman, doing domestic work, and working as a madam. During the last decade of her life, she made history by fighting for the legal right to be herself with the man she loved.

After marrying her second husband, soldier Reuben Anderson, in Oxnard, California, in 1944, local authorities discovered that she was assigned male at birth. The couple was charged with perjury for marrying despite their both being legally male, resulting in ten years of probation. Standing up to the charges against her, Anderson said, “I defy any doctor in the world to prove that I am not a woman. I have lived, dressed, acted just what I am, a woman.” Years later, Anderson and her husband were charged again, this time with fraud after she received federal money reserved for military spouses. Both went to prison and were banned from Oxnard upon their release.

Lucy Hicks Anderson spent the remainder of her life in Los Angeles until her death in 1954, at age 68, leaving behind a legacy of authenticity and determination in the face of unjust laws.


5 Black Trans Women who Paved the Way — Massachusetts Transgender Political Coalition

bisexual-community:

kosherqueer:

tertium—quid:

kosherqueer:

*very quiet voice* queer spaces need to be safe for people of faith too

For queer people of faith. Not for “I used to be homophobic, pat my back” people of faith. Not for “Jesus loves you ANY WAY, even…

bisexual-books:

desidere:

feminismandflowers:

desidere:

feminismandflowers:

being femme is not about being feminine. it’s about reclaiming what it is to be strong.

people read as feminine have also been condemned as weak, frail, unauthentic, and incapable as long as…